This conference will be virtual and hosted via Zoom. Abstracts are available below. Click on the paper title for more information!

Please note that all conference times are in Eastern Standard Time.

Click here for a downloadable version of our program

Day 1: Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Opening Remarks / 11:00 – 11:15 am

Keynote Address: Dr. Funké Aladejebi / 11:15 am – 12:00 pm

Lunch / 12:00 – 1:00 pm

Session 1.1: Toronto at the Margins / 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Moderator: Hannah Roth Cooley, University of Toronto

Gerrard India Bazaar: A History of Toronto’s First South Asian Ethnic Enclave
Aqeel Ihsan, York University

The Darkside of the Canadian Dream: A History of Housing Discrimination 1961-1977
Catherine Grant, University of Toronto

Gay Ghetto to Gay Village to Post Gay: Nostalgia & Crisis in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley Village
J. Gary Myers, York University

Session 1.2: Sites of Protest / 2:00 – 3:00 pm

Moderator: Siddharth Sridhar, University of Toronto

‘Sab Yaad Rakha Jayega’ (Everything Will Be Remembered): Memory and Forgetting in Archiving Protest
Shraddha Chatterjee, York University

Bringing the War Back Home: Exploring Protest, Policing and Militarization in the U.S. Carceral Landscape after 9/11
Ruqaiyah Zarook, New York University

Hybrid Patriotism and How Native American Actors Used American Ideology and Rhetoric to Further their Cause During the Cold War
Corbin Wilcock, University of Victoria

Session 1.3: Creating Identity / 3:00 – 4:00 pm

Moderator: Arshad (Ash) Desai, York University

Actions are Louder than Words: Race, Fitness, Sports and Protest in the Canadian Context, 1961-1993
Zachary Consitt, York University

The socio-ethnic and cultural makeup of the new Beylerbeyi Neighbourhood: The codes of a new settlement policy in the aftermath of the crisis
Nazlı Songülen, European University Institute

Hungarian Holocaust memoirists’ historiographical explanations of crises borne out of the World Wars
Sean Remz, Concordia University

Session 1.4: Writing to Remember / 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Moderator: Richard Robertson, York University

The Continuation of Trauma Through Transcribing: First Generation Holocaust Survivors
Sarah Snyder, University of Texas at Dallas

The Collective Memory in the Red Guard Memoirs in China and North America between the 1980s and the 1990s
Xuan (Jossie) Duan, University of Victoria

The Children of the 1940s: Memories of the Nazi Occupation, the Resistance, and the Civil War in Greece
Angelo Nicholas Laskaris, York University


Day 2: Thursday, April 29, 2021

Morning opening remarks / 9:45 am

Session 2.1: Conversations on Radical Thought / 10:00 – 11:00 am

Moderator: Arshad (Ash) Desai, York University

Instinct and the Limits of Historical Narration
Damanpreet Pelia, Yale University

Futurity Through: On BIPOC Feminist Resistance to Settler Colonial Displacement and Erasure
Kaylee Kagiavas, State University of New York at Buffalo

Whiteness and Black Lives: Confronting an Imposed Identity
Alisa Vitelli, McMaster University

Session 2.2: Confronting Change through the Arts / 11:00 – 12:00 pm

Moderator: Siddharth Sridhar, University of Toronto

Restoring the Ottoman Theatre History Towards the Centenary of the Armenian Genocide: Ambivalences of Confrontation in Şark Dişçisi (2011)
Şeyda Nur Yıldırım, Kadir Has University, Turkey

A Counterfactual Crusade in the Tyrrhenian: Manipulating Crisis and the Representation of Ottoman Ethnicity in the Art of Cosimo I de’ Medici’s Florence
Bennett Harrison, Syracuse University Florence

Crisis in the Book: Dracula and Degeneration
Ari Finnsson, University of Toronto

Lunch / 12:00 – 1:00 pm

Session 2.3: Crisis of Colonialism / 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Moderator: Esha Bhardwaj, York University

Crises and colonialism critical activism: Initiators of action and factors in shifting approaches to historiography
Annika Roes, SOAS University of London/ Philipps University of Marburg

Blockades: Confronting Canada’s Colonial Railway History
Thomas Blampied, University of Toronto

“Too Nomadic for Real Results”: Seasonality at the Bear Island Summer School, 1903-1951
Robert Olajos, Nipissing University

Session 2.4: (Il)legal Confrontations / 2:00 – 3:00 pm

Moderator: Angela Zhang, York University

Pitt’s Folly? Shedding New Light on England’s Divided Elite and the 1794 Treason Crisis
Richard Marshall, University of Plymouth

Appealing the Duel in Sixteenth-Century Italy
Aaron Miedema, York University

Session 2.5: Crisis of the Body / 3:00 – 4:00 pm

Moderator: Nico Mara-McKay, University of Toronto

AI and Sex Robots: An Examination of the History and Technologization of Sexuality
Keif Godbout-Kinney, Memorial University of Newfoundland

The ‘Atypical’ Example: Gender and Racial bias in the Canadian Anatomy Classroom, 1900-1950
Carly Naismith, York University

Age as a Category of Otherization: Scholarly Analyses of Youth in the Field of Canadian History
Evania Petrangelo-Porco, York University

Session 2.6: Environmental Crises / 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Moderator: Kate Bauer, University of Toronto

The rhetoric of environmental justice, unity, and the Warren County protests of 1982
Esther van ‘t Veen, York University

Storytelling and Oral History: Reflections on a Climate Change Communications Project
Kelly Hydrick, Simmons University

A Tale of Two Storms: Progressive Era Disaster Relief in Puerto Rico and Texas, 1899-1900
Ian Seavey, Texas A&M University


Day 3: Friday, April 30, 2021

Morning Opening Remarks / 9:45 am

Session 3.1: International Interventions / 10:00 – 11:00 am

Moderator: Hannah Roth Cooley, University of Toronto

“A Lesson in Domestic Science”: A Historiography of Gendered Missionary Education in Sub-Equatorial Africa, 1880-1940
Catherine Ramey, University of Toronto

Decolonization as crisis of historicism: Contextualizing Abdallah Laroui’s L’idéologie arabe contemporaine
Dillon Savage, University of Texas at Austin

Defining the Civilian: The ICRC Response to Crisis in Bosnia (1992-1995)
Helen Kennedy, Carleton University

Session 3.2: Crisis of Right-Wing Populism / 11:00 – 12:00 pm

Moderator: Richard Robertson, York University

Fascism on the Rebound? Collective Memory and the Populist Radical Right in Italy and Belgium
Jessi Gilchrist, University of Toronto

The “Western Civilization” Heritage Regime: Understanding the Insidious Power of a Famous Historical Concept
Graeme Sutherland, University of Toronto

The Origins of Right-Wing Populism and the Crisis of American Liberal Democracy
Matthew Giroux, University of Toronto

Lunch / 12:00 – 1:00 pm

Session 3.3: New Historiographical Approaches / 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Moderators: Heather McIntyre, U of T, and Esha Bhardwaj, York University

A Platform for the Pandemic Memory: Creating an Online Archive of Academic and Artistic Storytelling
Catharina Hansel, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa and University of Göttingen

Écrire la catastrophe « naturelle » – Une approche anthropologique des désastres comme objet d’étude
Paul Macalli, Université de Montréal

The ethical case for history–and why historians should make it
Hana Suckstorff, University of Toronto

Session 3.4: Resource Access during COVID-19 / 2:00 – 2:45 pm

Moderator: Esha Bhardwaj, York University

Double Occupation: Israeli Medical Apartheid
Rawan Nabil, York University

Pandemic Purchases: Grocery Stores and the Consumer Experience During the 1918 and COVID-19 Pandemic
Megan Kirby, York University

Break / 2:45 – 3:00 pm

Keynote Panel: “Conversations in Crisis” / 3:00 – 4:00 pm

with Dr. Kate Brown, Dr. Monica Green, and President of the Ontario Black History Society, Natasha Henry

Closing Remarks + Essay Prize Announcement / 4:00 pm


Aqeel Ihsan, Gerrard India Bazaar: A History of Toronto’s First South Asian Ethnic Enclave
The influx of immigrants from India starting in the 1970s coincided with the emergence of the Gerrard India Bazaar (GIB) in Toronto as an ethnic enclave and this was a crucial watershed moment for the Indian diaspora that allow them to preserve that aspect of their identity which was, and today still is, evoked through the consumption of Indian foodstuffs. As such, this paper will examine the emergence of the GIB as an ethnic enclave and argue that the grocery stores and restaurants that were founded in the bazaar functioned as spaces of belonging which created linkages to the homeland that aided Indian women in transferring their definition of ‘Indian culture’ to the subsequent generation. However, this process was complicated as Indian women were confronted with various challenges in instilling that culture that was reflected through foodways, especially when they struggled to maintain control over their kids’ evolving tastes and dietary preferences. 

Catherine Grant, The Darkside of the Canadian Dream: A History of Housing Discrimination, 1961-1977
Canada has its own brand of maple sugar coated anti Black sentiment and racism. Anti Black housing discrimination in Toronto 1961-1977 is a case in point. This period mirrors the state commitment to expansion through immigration by the establishment of the Department of Manpower and Immigration. After the introduction of an immigration points based criteria in 1967 , a cohort of young, ambitious and educated Black Caribbean peoples largely settled in the Greater Toronto area. There were those unhappy with their new neighbours movement to the big city and deployed a range of covert tactics the restrict their fellow residents movement on the basis of their skin colour.

J. Gary Myers, Gay Ghetto to Gay Village to Post Gay: Nostalgia & Crisis in Toronto’s Church-Wellsley Village
Gay culture has evolved in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley Village over the past 50 years. Recognition of greater fluidity in sexual and gendered identities have prompted recent scholars to theorize about a post-gay period in which the social, cultural, and political experiences of an older generation of gay men differ from a younger, queer generation who no longer align themselves to gay identity, culture, or space, and see little need to sustain them. This research examines the Village’s erosion by advancing Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) strategies to convey this history, before the faces, spaces, and traces of these gay memories are lost.

Shraddha Chatterjee, ‘Sab Yaad Rakha Jayega’ (Everything Will Be Remembered): Memory and Forgetting in Archiving Protest
In December 2019, the right-wing Indian government announced that it will create a National Register of Citizens (NRC) to provide citizenship to India’s migrant and undocumented communities. Simultaneously, it passed a Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) that would bestow citizenship along religious lines, putting numerous predominantly Muslim communities at risk of losing even their current citizenship. This led to widespread protests across India, and established multiple sites of ongoing resistance. In this paper, I will reflect on how protestors consciously created a living archive of the protests, thereby laying claim to memorialization of, and as, resistance. Drawing from subaltern historiographic work, I will situate these processes of writing contemporary and dynamic histories against the insidious creation of anti-protest sentiment on behalf of the government and media.

Ruqaiyah Zarook, Bringing the War Back Home: Exploring Protest, Policing and Militarization in the U.S. Carceral Landscape after 9/11
This paper analyzes the history of policing and its relationship with suppressing protest in the United States. After 9/11, the Bush administration reacted to the attacks by declaring a “war on terrorism” that would help to authorize carceral policies and strengthen presidential executive powers that would violate civil liberties and civil rights, as well as expand the powers of carceral surveillance by police. There is evidence of government surveillance that has been justified because of efforts to fight anti-terrorism, but we know that it has also helped to suppress political activity and protesting as well. I argue that this post-9/11 carcerality still exists to this day and ask what the implications of this carcerality is for the future of protest and resistance in the United States, from Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter.

Corbin Wilcock, Hybrid Patriotism and How Native American Actors Used American Ideology and Rhetoric to Further their Cause During the Cold War
Throughout the Cold War era, Indigenous people in the USA were in a unique position and crisis as the only group that was seen as part of the Third World that occupied the same physical space as the USA. The otherness of Indigenous people resulted in a particular approach that is revealed by examining American ideology and rhetoric during the Cold War. This was largely achieved by a “hybrid nationalism” where Indigenous people simultaneously embraced their imposed American citizenship, as well as their identity to their Indigenous nation. Native Americans embraced American rhetoric by locating themselves within it.

Zachary Consitt, Actions are Louder than Words: Race, Fitness, Sports and Protest in the Canadian Context, 1961-1993
The delay by a league predominantly consisting of white Canadian hockey players will be the focus of this paper. This paper will try to put forward an explanation that in a historically significant moment, white Canadian athletes and administrators did not do enough for their colleagues of colour. By analyzing federal policies in the second half of the twentieth century then investigating the lack of inclusion among Black athletes in winter sports, this paper will explore the historic roots of this reluctance and demonstrate how Canada’s sport and fitness system was not as inclusive as policymakers claimed.

Nazlı Songülen, The socio-ethnic and cultural makeup of the new Beylerbeyi Neighbourhood: The codes of a new settlement policy in the aftermath of the crisis
The end of the traumatic defeat of the Ottoman Empire against Russia in 1774 was a turning point in Ottoman history, whose aftermath defined as a time of crisis, paving the way for certain institutional reforms. One of these reforms was to centralise the waqf system, which triggered the emergence of a new settlement policy in Istanbul on a micro-scale. This research investigates a critical examples of this process, the development of the Beylerbeyi neighbourhood on the Asian side of the Bosphorus. It focuses on some petitions concerning the residents of the new neighbourhood to demonstrate how different socio-economic and religious identities were in the process of being redefined by the central government in these times of crises.

Sean Remz, Hungarian Holocaust memoirists’ historiographical explanations of crises borne out of the World Wars
There is significant interest in the Hungarian historiography of the post-World War I-era and World War II-era crises. In a time when the fake news and ultranationalist historical novel-writing of Cecile Tormay and József Nyirő are part of the educational and commemorative policies of the Hungarian state, many genre-crossing Holocaust memoirs and postmemoirs provide an important corrective to the historical writing on these crises. Likewise, Ferenc Laczó’s Hungarian Jews in the Age of Genocide systematically accounts for the responses of Hungarian-Jewish intellectuals to these crises, which explore the historical sensibilities of the relationship between Jews, Hungarian identity, and state loyalty.

Sarah Snyder, The Continuation of Trauma Through Transcribing: First Generation Survivors’ Memoirs
When producing their memoirs survivors often present their stories in chronological timelines; however, this is not how memory functions. The present and the past are not mutually exclusive, but rather linked as those memories are what formed the person of the present. This temporality can limit readers understanding of what the Holocaust as readers may come to believe that the survivors’ trauma ended in 1945. In the case of the Holocaust, there cannot be a ‘post-Holocaust’ for survivors and their descendants as it annihilates any possibility of expressing the continuation of trauma through time.

Xuan (Jossie) Duan, The Collective Memory in the Red Guard Memoirs in China and North America Between the 1980s and the 1990s
The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) in China deeply wounded the collective identity of the nation’s population. Individuals and social institutions have been seeking ways to remember its disastrous outcomes and historical lessons. This paper examines the connections between the framework of collective memory and the narratives of individual memory about the movement, asking how the two kinds of memory relate to each other in narratives (Halbwachs, 1992). Reflecting on four autobiographical works by former Red Guards, it suggests that memoir manifests the nexus between individual memory and the social framework of the collective memory of the Cultural Revolution, as the latter reveals itself in the forms of narrative chronology, verbal conventions, and recurring scenes in the texts.

Angelo Nicholas Laskaris, The Children of the 1940s Memories of the Nazi Occupation, the Resistance, and the Civil War in Greece
The paper illustrates the narrative of traumatic childhood memories during the 1940s in Greece. This decade was ultimately the deadliest and bloodiest in the history of the modern Greek state. The research is based on oral histories of those born in the late 1920s and during the 1930s to document their experiences as children of war, occupation, and famine. It argues that the trauma inflicted by such events caused the children of the 1940s to have a ‘lost childhood,’ resulting in them to mature far too early and live with the physical and mental trauma(s) for the rest of their lives. Interviews were conducted by the author and from the Memories of Occupation archive. Not only does this paper address the concept of crisis, it underlines the effects war has on a society.

Damanpreet Pelia, Instinct and the Limits of Historical Narration
In his 1971 lectures on The Black Jacobins (1938), C.L.R. James speculates that were he to rewrite his study of the Haitian Revolution, he would write a history more like Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction (1935). After all, Du Bois understood the function of the instinctual revolutionary capacities of the enslaved masses in the dialectical progression of history. Through a reading of James’s history of the Haitian Revolution and his 1947 pamphlet “Dialectical Materialism and the Fate of Humanity” alongside Black Reconstruction, this paper offers a reading of “instinct” as a narrative device that both contends with the limits of the empirical and provides a framework through which to think about the history of capitalism as the history of collective struggle.

Kaylee Kagiavas, Futurity Through: On BIPOC Feminist Resistance to Settler Colonial Displacement and Erasure
BIPOC Feminist scholars Saidiya Hartman and Cutcha Risling Badly both suggest cross-temporal, communally-specific interventions of undoing historically informed settler colonial processes of erasure and displacement, respectively. Hartman negotiates an archival lack/erasure leading to a crisis/reorienting of history, where “critical fabulation” becomes an archival and intra-personal method of working through that suggests futurity potentials. For Baldy, forced displacement leading to communal separation, therefore a loss of practiced tradition can be found within the truth-holding archive of oral histories and negotiated colonial archives, which inform praxis-oriented working through and toward a future beyond violent colonial impacts.

Alisa Vitelli, Whiteness and Black Lives: Confronting an Imposed Identity
This paper explores how members of the Black community have understood, interacted with, and confronted whiteness. The literary works of W.E.B. Du Bois, Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, and Steve Biko are used to examine the different historical commentaries regarding whiteness. These prominent Black figures articulate unique perspectives about how the Black experience is shaped by racial forces and the challenge of overcoming these long-established norms. Notable themes that appear in this discussion include identity, representation, and activism. When these separate narratives come together, these authors offer us a glimpse into how whiteness has been a point of crisis for the Black community.

Şeyda Nur Yıldırım, Restoring the Ottoman Theatre History Towards the Centenary of the Armenian Genocide: Ambivalences of Confrontation in Şark Dişçisi (2011)
After the Armenian Genocide in 1915 and the inception of the Republic of Turkey as a nation-state in 1923, Armenians lost their position in the theatre world. As Turkish theatre historians gradually erased the powerful role Armenians played in the development of European-style theatre in the Ottoman Empire from the mainstream historical narratives, Armenian playwrights were also excluded from the official accounts of the Ottoman dramatic canon. This presentation will examine the crisis in theatre historiography by focusing on the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality City Theatres’ adaptation of Hagop Baronian’s (1843-1891) 1868 play Adamnapuyjın Aravelyan (The Oriental Dentist) as Şark Dişçisi in 2011.

Bennett Harrison, Counterfactual Crusade in the Tyrrhenian: Manipulating Crisis, Visualizing Ottoman Ethnicity, and Painting History in Ducal Florence
This paper considers the relationship between crisis, visual representation, and historical narrative by examining painted representations of Ottoman Turks in early modern Florentine art during the rule of Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici (1537-1574). By scrutinizing a painting of Turks Routed at Piombino by Giorgio Vasari, the famous biographer of Italian artists and court painter of Coismo I, this paper demonstrates how Vasari manipulated the historical record of the Battle of Piombino and tacitly racialized Ottoman figures. This painting provides a case study for how the seemingly realistic yet actually counterfactual representations of Florentine history painting shaped crisis.

Ari Finnsson, Crisis in the Book: Dracula and Degeneration
This presentation addresses the theme of crisis in a historical and methodological context through a case study of Bram Stoker’s famous Victorian Gothic novel: Dracula. The presentation is interested in three related questions. First, what is the notion of crisis developed in the novel. Second, how does the novel’s themes relate to the context of nineteenth century fears around social degeneration. Third, how can the historian connect the novel to its historical context. I argue that central to the book is a process whereby fears around social degeneration become crystallized in the biology of the novel’s characters. This symbolic act can then be usefully related to its social context on two levels—as a specific intervention in the debate on Social Darwinism and part of a larger concern current in the nineteenth century around the relation of the visible to the invisible.

Annika Roes, Crises and colonialism critical activism: Initiators of action and factors in shifting approaches to historiography
What draws people into activism? How do crises affect activists’ understanding of historiography? This presentation explores different facets of “crisis” in relation to three different civil society groups in Germany from the 1980s until today that critically engage with Germany’s colonialism. Crises are identified as a reason for action for civil society groups and as context factors that shape actors’ understandings of historiography and their political practice.

Thomas Blampied, Blockades: Confronting Canada’s Colonial Railway History
For weeks during the winter of 2020, rail blockades took place across Canada in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en land defenders who were protecting their territory against a militarized police force and pipeline construction. The choice to block tracks across the country speaks to the role of railways in the ongoing Canadian colonial project. Surprisingly, historians have said little about the relationship between railway infrastructure and colonialism. This paper argues that Canada’s railway history must be revisited to account for the active role railway construction and operation played – and continues to play – in Canadian colonialism.

Robert Olajos, “Too Nomadic for Real Results”: Seasonality at the Bear Island Summer School, 1903-1951
In 1903, the Temagami Nishnaabeg lived a seasonal life. They spent winters apart on family traplines and summers together on Bear Island. By 1951, most lived year-round on Bear Island. This period of crisis and change coincided with the operation of the Bear Island Summer School. Run by the Department of Indian Affairs, this one-room school provided an assimilationist education while exerting federal authority. This presentation asks how seasonality was used at the Bear Island Summer School. Based on primary sources, my research finds that both the Bear Islanders and Indian Affairs used seasonality for their respective benefit.

Richard Marshall, Pitt’s Folly? Shedding New Light on England’s Divided Elite and the 1794 Treason Crisis
This paper explores how letters by two members of England’s elite, Henry Addington and Solicitor General John Mitford impact on existing understanding of how the 1794 treason crisis was perpetuated. The letters reveal both men believed the trials a miscalculation by Prime Minister William Pitt likely to destabilise the polity and society. They also imply that Mitford and Attorney General Sir John Scott had not supported the charges and considered resignation, challenging existing historiography which casts both as ‘ringleaders’ plotting to destroy political dissent in England. The emerging picture is of a divided elite and crisis driven by paranoia.

Aaron Miedema, Appealing the Duel in Sixteenth-Century Italy
In 1560, Francesco Guevara held a duel to which his opponent failed to show up. Guevara then published all the formalities and ceremonies so the world would know Giovanni Vincentio Capece was infamous due to his absence. This unique document is known to historians. But, this was only the final chapter in a much larger story hidden, until now, in manuscript in Modena and Naples. A story of the duel Guevara lost to Capece two years earlier. This paper will, through the close examination of the two duels between Guevara and Capece, with a particular focus on Guevara’s use of aristocratic networks and changing tastes in print to overturn his defeat in combat to Capece. In so doing, it is possible to highlight the destabilizing effect of print on the practice of the duel in sixteenth century Italy.

Keif Godbout-Kinney, AI and Sex Robots: An Examination of the History and Technologization of Sexuality
The emergence of sex robots with rudimentary but slowly advancing AI is a relatively new phenomenon, and there is little understanding about what the possible implications of these automatons could be, particularly regarding their impact on human sexuality. However, there is a historical fascination with automata that can be traced to policies in WWII, colonial voyages from the French and Spanish, and the ancient Greeks (Ferguson, 2010). . Beginning with an examination of the past, I look at this relationship of sexuality and technology and the ways it has shaped not only how each of these categories are viewed in relation to each other, but also the ways that they have had a direct impact on the development of social practices.

Carly Naismith, The ‘Atypical’ Example: Gender and Racial bias in the Canadian Anatomy Classroom, 1900-1950
Between 1900 and 1950, the typical cadaver sent for dissection in all Canadian medical schools were white men. Consequently, female and/or racial minority cadavers often received treatment considerably different from the average subject. This often took the form of dissection for a special class, preparation for the anatomical museum, or being kept in the dissection room for an extraordinarily long period of time. Assessing dissection room records from Canadian medical schools my presentation will look at the difference in treatment that these racialized and gendered bodies received. Namely, I will look at how social prejudices seeped into anatomy classes, affecting how cadavers were procured, dissected, distributed, displayed, and studied in the first 50 years of the twentieth century.

Evania Pietrangelo-Porco, Age as a Category of Otherization: Scholarly Analyses of Youth in the Field of Canadian History
My paper examines the “crisis of youth” presented in four major Canadian historiographical works (Owram’s “Born at the Right Time”, Jackson’s “One of the Boys”, Commachio’s “The Dominion of Youth”, and Myers’ “Caught”). Through the figures of the hippie, young soldier, and “modern girl”, a youth culture emerges in opposition to the “adult world”. It creates and separates the biologically, socio-culturally, and ideologically distinct spheres of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. In this paper, I argue that youth emerges as “The Other” in these works. This emergence occurs both within the authors’ periods of study (approximately 1900-1970) and their overarching analyses.

Esther van ‘t Veen, The rhetoric of environmental justice, unity, and the Warren County protests of 1982
The paper presented is an MA History thesis on the Warren County, NC protests in 1982 against the allocation of a hazardous landfill in the area. It focusses on the way in which narratives related to identity, primarily group-identity, generated and reflected unity among African American and white people. It also analyzes factors like religion, Civil Rights Movement leaders, and song, that amplified those narratives. As the effects of climate change are becoming an everyday hazard for many around the world, this presentation hopes to function as a reminder of the power of language and unification when combating environmental injustice.

Kelly Hydrick, Storytelling and Oral History: Reflections on a Climate Change Communications Project
Although the effects are disproportionate, climate change impacts everyone; thus, everyone has a climate story. Since September 2020, I have completed eleven oral history interviews regarding peoples’ thoughts about climate change. Historians may take on many roles during a crisis and I draw on my roles as a historian, archivist, and nascent activist to address some ways the climate crisis can be documented (oral history and storytelling), some reasons why we do so (such as creating historical records and/or engaging in activist work), and what ultimately becomes of the information that is created (considering issues of accessibility and use).

Ian Seavey, A Tale of Two Storms: Progressive Era Disaster Relief in Puerto Rico and Texas, 1899-1900
On August 8, 1899, hurricane San Ciriaco ravaged Puerto Rico, killing nearly 3,000 people in the floodwaters. Only a few months had passed since the island’s sovereignty had transferred from Spanish to American rule in 1898. On September 8, 1900, exactly one year and a month after hurricane San Ciriaco struck Puerto Rico, a great storm lambasted Galveston, Texas claiming the lives of over 6,000 people. I argue that both storms should be examined together because the relief efforts were informed by Progressive Era ideas about race, class, and poverty. In both cases elites determined who received aid, imposed conditions that were attached to the aid, and created distinctions between worthy and unworthy poor. The two relief efforts showcase the escalated Federal role because they were the first instances of Federally organized disaster relief.

Catherine Ramey, “A Lesson in Domestic Science”: A Historiography of Gendered Missionary Education in Sub-Equatorial Africa, 1880-1940
From the late nineteenth to early twentieth centuries, missionary work was the primary vehicle through which European colonizers imposed western, Christian norms on African peoples. Recent studies on missionization of Africa have explored Christianization through proselytization and the establishment of Christian churches. However, little attention has been paid to the gendering of missionary education for girls. This historiographical presentation will consider scholarship over the past thirty years that has examined missionary education for girls in sub-equatorial Africa between 1880 and 1940. I will highlight the importance of using theories of Women and Gender Studies in analyses of mission work, particularly education, in the African context.

Dillon Savage, Decolonization as crisis of historicism: Contextualizing Abdallah Laroui’s L’idéologie arabe contemporaine
I offer a reading of the Moroccan historian Abdallah Laroui’s book L’idéologie arabe contemporaine (1967) that emphasizes Laroui’s ambivalence. Situated both within and outside the intellectual tradition he criticizes, he is both preoccupied by the Arab world’s past and interested in its future in ways that reflect his unique personal background and intellectual formation. I explore the intellectual and political contexts informing the text in order to ask how this reading might enhance or challenge current historical conceptualizations of decolonization.

Helen Kennedy, Defining the Civilian: The ICRC Response to Crisis in Bosnia (1992-1995)
This paper explores the role of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in framing the Bosnian War (1992-1995). Though the ICRC remains famously impartial in its work, it commented on atrocities occurring in Bosnia more than it had in any other conflict. Through an examination of press releases, this paper aims to answer the question of how the ICRC defined both the conflict and the possibilities for peace. The focus of the international intervention in Bosnia was primarily humanitarian, so the way that humanitarians were conceptualizing the crisis becomes in itself a central component of historical practice.

Jessi Gilchrist, Fascism on the Rebound? Collective Memory and the Populist Radical Right in Italy and Belgium
My research explores how collective memory about the fascist past has created space for the far right in Italian and Belgian politics. I use David Art’s work on the German-speaking world as a point of departure to compare how official reckoning with the fascist past has shaped the trajectories of Europe’s two major separatist populist radical right parties: the Italian Lega Nord and the Belgian Vlaams Blok. My work demonstrates that collective memory about the fascist past has profoundly shaped the capacity of populist radical right parties to both establish their legitimacy and capitalize on the political space available within the party system.

Graeme Sutherland, The “Western Civilization” Heritage Regime: Understanding the Insidious Power of a Famous Historical Concept
This paper proposes the application of a theory borrowed from anthropology, the idea of a “heritage regime”, to help us understand the development of Western Civilization as a historical concept in the United States in the 20th century. Trump’s recent appeals to Western Civ will be used as a contemporary reference point that demonstrates the importance of exploring the history of this concept in terms of its implication with race and racism.

Matthew Giroux, The Origins of Right-Wing Populism and the Crisis of Liberal Democracy
This presentation places the January 6th 2021 storming of the US capital within the broader historical context of right-wing populist opposition the organizing values and programs of modern liberal democracies. I examine this primarily through a discussion of the political career of the right-wing populist pundit, activist, and presidential candidate Patrick J. Buchanan, focusing on how the political program and ethos of Trumpian populism has deep roots in the philosophical and strategic thought that defined the foundations of Buchanan’s career, spanning back to his time in the Nixon administration.

Catharina Hänsel, A Platform for the Pandemic Memory: Creating an online archive of academic and artistic storytelling
The Pandemic Academic platform is an interdisciplinary approach of collecting stories of covid experiences by artists, students and healthcare workers in Europe and Asia. Highlighting the commonalities and divergences in the global experience of the pandemic, this paper seeks to address the issue of building up an online archive to preserve knowledge outside the realm of tech giants such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

Paul Macalli, Écrire la catastrophe « naturelle » – Une approche anthropologique des désastres comme objet d’étude.
L’histoire tout comme l’anthropologie s’évertuent au fil des situations de crise à penser à de nouveaux outils méthodologiques pour approcher les catastrophes et écrire sur elles. L’attention porté au catastrophisme (Dupuy, 2002 ; Citton, 2009) répond en partie à ce nouvel élan pour une étude des désastres.

Hana Suckstorff, The Ethical Case for Historyand why historians should make it
This paper makes a case for ethics-based arguments in defense of studying history. At a time that enrolments are dropping and the quality of public discourse continues to decline, historians can and should argue for their discipline based on its ability to form us into more empathetic, imaginative people.

Rawan Nabil, Double Occupation: Israeli Medical Apartheid
COVID-19 continues to have devastating global impacts, especially on the marginalized, in both the core and periphery. The realities of COVID-19 in an open-air prison like Gaza and occupied Palestinian territories (oPt) have been even more devastating as Israeli apartheid grips its clutch on Palestinians through a double occupation of military colonial violence, as well as medical apartheid through its targeted exclusion of COVID-19 vaccines to 5 million Palestinians. While Israeli citizens enjoy a COVID free future, Palestinians are under medical apartheid system that could mean life or death during a global pandemic.

Megan Kirby, Pandemic Purchases: Grocery Stores and the Consumer Experience During the 1918 and COVID-19 Pandemics
This paper will explore the relationship between grocers and shoppers in Toronto during two moments of crisis: the 1918 influenza and Covid-19. I will compare and contrast the way in which product placement, store layouts, advertisements, and government regulation impacted grocery shopping during both pandemics. In each pandemic, grocers and consumers have experienced instances of stockpiling, food shortages, and were resistant to store closures proposed by their municipal government. How grocery shopping was, and is, managed during a pandemic adds a new narrative to Toronto’s consumer history, and explores important dimensions of health, race, gender, and class.